Winter Bird Feeding

November 30, 2009 at 7:34 am | Posted in Lifescape | Leave a comment
Provide cover. Birds need shelter from harsh conditions, and vegetation in your yard will help to furnish it. Don’t prune back dead vegetation like vines and stalks – these provide both valuable winter cover and nesting material for birds in the spring. Balconies have a special opportunity to attract nesting birds as they provide great shelter.

Add habitat in your backyard in the form of a brush pile, which may attract foraging birds and mammals, and even over-wintering reptiles, amphibians and insects.

clipped from www.naturecanada.ca

Preparing Backyards and Balconies for Birds This Winter

Cardinal in Winter

Think Food. Feeders in the winter provide an extra energy source for birds that stay in the area during winter. Provide a number of feeder styles and types of feed (sunflower, thistle, unsalted peanuts, sliced fruit, seed scattered on stamped down snow) to attract many different birds to your yard. Feeders can also be easily attached to windows using suction cups. Place feeders where they are sheltered from predators and weather, and clean feeders regularly.

Small space? No problem! Some
feeders are available with a suction cup
attachment that can be stuck right to the window!

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Don’t remove dead flower heads in the autumn. Don’t cut back old annual or perennial plants. The seed heads that are left in place on plants such as coneflowers, sunflowers and thistle will provide a lasting source of seed for finches and sparrows.

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