Viking Treasure Hoard

August 28, 2009 at 2:23 pm | Posted in Lifescape | Leave a comment
more (at source): The hoard – which includes a silver cup estimated to be worth more than £200,000, as well as 617 coins and various silver fragments, ingots and rings, will go on display in both York and in the capital after careful conservation work which began a month ago.

Experts hope the process will reveal crucial details about the Viking era. Initial examinations suggest the treasure dates to 927 or 928. Conservation experts have already revealed remarkable insights: the cup, which has been gilded inside and out, is most likely to have belonged in a church, with vines decorating its exterior – a Viking symbol of Christ. Some of the coins shed new light on the period – parts of Britain such as Staffordshire and Yorkshire were already believed lost by the Vikings and under Anglo-Saxon dominion, yet there are coins which show the Vikings were still creating their own currency in these regions. One such coin, with the word “Rorivacastr” on it, is believed to have originated from

clipped from www.independent.co.uk

clipped from www.independent.co.uk

clipped from www.independent.co.uk

By Arifa Akbar, Arts Correspondent

The “largest and most important” Viking hoard found in Britain since 1840, which could shed new light on the historical period, will go on display in London and in York after careful conservation work.

The treasure, probably buried in a hurry by a wealthy Viking in Northumbria after the Anglo-Saxons had invaded the region, could reveal lost historical secrets, according to an expert at the British Museum. The museum has acquired the £1m hoard jointly with the York Museum Trust in Yorkshire.

The “once in a lifetime” find, which could redraw historical lines of Anglo-Saxon conquest over the Vikings in 10th century Britain, has been valued at £1,082,000. It was discovered in a field in Harrogate, North Yorkshire, by a father and son metal-detector team in January 2007, who will now share the money with the owner of the land on which the precious antiquities were found.

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