Huge Flying Reptiles Ate Dinosaurs

May 30, 2008 at 1:36 pm | Posted in Lifescape | Leave a comment
clipped from www.livescience.com

With a name like T. rex, you’d expect to be safe from even the fiercest paleo-bullies. Turns out, ancient, flying reptiles could have snacked on Tyrannosaurus Rex babies and other landlubbing runts of the dinosaur world.

A new study reveals a group of flying reptiles that lived during the Age of Dinosaurs some 230 million to 65 million years ago did not catch prey in flight, but rather stalked them on land.

Until now, paleontologists pictured the so-called “winged lizards” or pterosaurs as skim-feeders. In this vision, the creatures would have flown over lakes and oceans grabbing fish from the water’s surface, much as gulls do today.

“In our hypothesis, flight is primarily a locomotive method,” said co-researcher Mark Witton of the University of Portsmouth in England. “They’re just using it to get from point A to point B. We think the majority of their lives, when they’re feeding and reproducing, that’s all being done on the ground rather than in the air.”

The Epic of Gilgamesh – the oldest written story on Earth

May 30, 2008 at 1:33 pm | Posted in Lifescape | Leave a comment
clipped from www.ancienttexts.org

The Epic of Gilgamesh is, perhaps, the oldest written story on Earth. It comes to us from Ancient Sumeria, and was originally written on 12 clay tablets in cunieform script. It is about the adventures of the historical King of Uruk (somewhere between 2750 and 2500 BCE).

clipped from evans-experientialism.freewebspace.com
clipped from www.ancienttexts.org
Supreme over other kings, lordly in appearance,
he is the hero, born of Uruk, the goring wild bull.
He walks out in front, the leader,
and walks at the rear, trusted by his companions.
Mighty net, protector of his people,
raging flood-wave who destroys even walls of stone!
clipped from www.allaboutarchaeology.org
clipped from www.ancienttexts.org

It was he who opened the mountain passes,
who dug wells on the flank of the mountain.
It was he who crossed the ocean, the vast seas, to the rising sun,
who explored the world regions, seeking life.
It was he who reached by his own sheer strength Utanapishtim, the Faraway,
who restored the sanctuaries (or: cities) that the Flood had destroyed!
clipped from www.aina.org
clipped from www.ancienttexts.org
beautiful, handsomest of men,
… perfect

Stonehenge may have been royal burials

May 30, 2008 at 1:27 pm | Posted in Lifescape | Leave a comment
I can’t help but feel all the fuss and it turns out to be a cemetary
clipped from uk.reuters.com

Stonehenge may have been a burial ground for an ancient royal family, researchers said on Thursday.

New radiocarbon dates of human remains excavated from the ancient stone monument suggest it was used as a cemetery from its inception just after 3000 BC until well after the larger circle of stones went up around 2500 BC.

Previously, archaeologists had believed people were buried at Stonehenge between 2700 and 2600 B.C.

“The hypothesis we are working on is that Stonehenge represents a place of the dead,” said Mike Parker Pearson, an archaeologist at the University of Sheffield, who is leading an excavation of the site. “That seems to be very clear.”

“A further twist is that the people buried at Stonehenge may have been the elite of their society, an ancient royal British dynasty, perhaps.”

Built between 3000 and 1600 BC as a temple, burial ground, astronomical calendar or all three, the stone circle is sometimes called “Britain’s pyramids”.

Photo

How to Unleash Your Creativity

May 30, 2008 at 1:26 pm | Posted in Lifescape | Leave a comment
This clip is only the intro,
and interesting read,
please see at source.
clipped from www.sciam.com

Experts discuss tips and tricks to let loose your inner ingenuity

In a discussion with Scientific American Mind executive editor Mariette DiChristina, three noted experts on creativity, each with a very different perspective and background, reveal powerful ways to unleash your creat­ive self.

John Houtz is a psychologist and professor at Fordham University. His most recent book is The Educational Psychology of Creativity (Hamptom Press, 2002).

Julia Cameron is an award-winning poet, playwright and filmmaker. Her book The Artist’s Way (Jeremy P. Tarcher/Putnam, 2002) has sold more than three million copies worldwide. Her latest book is The Writing Diet.
Robert Epstein is a visiting scholar at the University of California, San Diego. Contributing editors for Scientific American Mind and former editor in chief of Psychology Today, Epstein has written several books on creativity, including The Big Book of Creativity Games (McGraw-Hill, 2000).
  blog it

Rare uncontacted Amazon tribe photographed

May 30, 2008 at 1:22 pm | Posted in Lifescape | 1 Comment
clipped from www.msnbc.msn.com
Amazon Indians from one of the world’s last uncontacted tribes have been photographed from the air, with striking images released on Thursday showing them painted bright red and brandishing bows and arrows.

The photographs of the tribe near the border between Brazil and Peru are rare evidence that such groups exist. A Brazilian official involved in the expedition said many of them are in increasing danger from illegal logging.

“The world needs to wake up to this, and ensure that their territory is protected in accordance with international law. Otherwise, they will soon be made extinct,” said Stephen Corry, the director of Survival International, which supports tribal people around the world.

Of more than 100 uncontacted tribes worldwide, more than half live in either Brazil or Peru, Survival International says. It says all are in grave danger of being forced off their land, killed and ravaged by new diseases.

Breath In, Breath Out

May 30, 2008 at 1:18 pm | Posted in Lifescape | Leave a comment
clipped from www.treehugger.com

It’s not a new ad by Greenpeace, but it’s beautiful and we’ve never featured it on TreeHugger before, so here it is.

The central message of the ad is quite important: oceans get too little credit for their oxygen production, as well as their capacity to absorb CO2. So the next time someone mentions tropical rainforests as “the lungs of the Earth”, have a thought for poor forgotten phytoplanktons. See also: ::Video: Amazing Commercial — Can’t tell you more, ::Best Solar-Power Commercial Ever?

Funny Cartoons

May 30, 2008 at 1:14 pm | Posted in Lifescape | Leave a comment
clipped from www.linkinn.com
Funny Cartoons
Funny Cartoons
Funny Cartoons
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Funny Cartoons
Funny Cartoons
Funny Cartoons
Funny Cartoons
Funny Cartoons
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Funny Cartoons
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